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    Gaze up at Pulpit Rock
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    A city of two halves
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    A trip on Flåm’s famous Railway
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    Views from the Stegastein viewpoint
Ocean Cruises
Saga Cruises

Scenic Summer Fjords

Saga Pearl II departing Dover

from £1,326 6 2
Including optional travel insurance or a price reduction of £72 if not required
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Discover Norway

Norway's picture-perfect landscapes await you on this week-long, summertime cruise. World-famous fjords, quaint villages and soaring mountains will be some of the sights to greet you as Saga Pearl II cruises across Norway’s most impressive fjord and pauses at Flåm and Stavanger. The only question is, how will you choose to explore… on foot, by boat, by train or by helicopter?

Inspiring experiences to enjoy…a ride past waterfalls and mountains on the famous Flåm Railway, gazing up at Pulpit Rock during a boat trip on Lysefjord, and a breathtaking helicopter trip over Norway’s stunning scenery.

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Dover

Embark Saga Pearl II.

Depart 0800.

Known as the gateway of England, Dover welcomes millions of visitors from all over the globe each year in its role as the ferry capital of the world and the second busiest cruise port in the UK. The White Cliffs Country has a rich heritage. Within the walls of the town’s iconic castle, over 2,000 years of history waits to be explored, whilst the town’s museum is home to the Dover Bronze Age Boat, the world’s oldest known seagoing vessel. The town’s cliffs that are a welcome sight for today's cross-channel travellers also served as the control centre for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.

FactFile

Population 40,000
Language English
Currency British Pounds Sterling
Time Difference N/A
Climate Temperate with mild summers and cool winters, with a prevailing south-westerly wind throughout the year.
Ship berths at Dover Cruise Terminal.
Distance from Centre 1 mile
Distance from gangway to coach 400 yards, through the cruise terminal.

Useful Information

Shopping The main shops are found on Cannon Street and Biggin Street.
Shopping Opening Hours 0900 to 1730 Monday to Saturday. A few shops are open on Sundays.
Post Office The main Post Office is located inside the Costcutter store on Pencester Road.
Tourist Office The Tourist Office is located inside the Town Museum on Market Square.
How to Phone Home For the UK dial the full STD code followed by the subscriber's number.
Emergency Services Dial 999.
Banks Banks and ATMs are located on Cannon Street.

Spend the day at sea.

Flåm

⚓ Land by launch or tender. 

Arrive 1400 on July 8. Depart 0700 on July 9.

The pretty village of Flåm is tucked away on the shores of a branch of Sognefjord, Norway’s largest and best known fjord. The picturesque surroundings of meadows, orchards and fields of greenery that creep up the sides of the imposing mountains attract visitors from all over the world. The best way to enjoy the scenery is to ride the famous Flåm Railway. This locomotive marvel ventures 2,850 feet up mountain gorges and stops at all the best sights, including the mighty Kjosfossen Waterfall, which cascades 738 feet over the mountainside. If you’re feeling energetic, a hike through Flåm Valley brings you even closer to the scenery and you’ll pass meadows, brooks and waterfalls before arriving in Berekvam Halt. Alternatively, you may like to head to the traditional fjordland village of Aurland, which is set around a 13th-century church and provides a gateway to the amazing Stegastein viewpoint, a lookout platform offering magnificent views over Aurlandsfjord.

The village of Flåm, surrounded by dramatic mountain scenery, lies in the heart of western Norway at the innermost part of Aurlandsfjord, a tributary of the Sognefjord. Tourists come from all over the world to ride on the famous Flåm Railway, which runs up to Myrdal to connect with the main Oslo to Bergen line. A masterpiece of engineering, it offers one of Europe’s most scenic train journeys, passing cascading waterfalls, steep hillsides and snow-capped mountains. Over a distance of less than 13 miles, the track climbs from sea level to approximately 2,850 feet, crossing back and forth over rivers and through 20 tunnels. A museum at the station tells the history of the line. Flåm is also home to the Ægir Microbrewery, located directly on the pier: guided tours and tastings are available. Please bear in mind that the Flåm Railway is very popular and capacity is limited, and therefore any excursions involving a train ride must be booked in advance: these tours will not be available from the Shore Excursions Desk on board ship once the cruise has started.

FactFile

Population 450 (approximate)
Language Norwegian
Currency Norwegian Kroner
Time Difference UK+1
Climate Temperate with rain showers in the summer and cold with some snow in the winter
Ship berths at At anchor, close by in the fjord
Distance from Centre The tender pier is located in the centre of Flåm.
Distance from gangway to coach Less than 100 yards

Useful Information

Shopping A small selection of shops, selling locally produced goods as well as traditional souvenirs, can be found in central Flåm as well as at the railway station and along the pier.
Shopping Opening Hours Most are open from 1000-1800.
Post Office There is no post office, but stamps can be bought from souvenir shops or at the Co-op store behind the station.
Tourist Office The Tourist Office is located inside the station building and is open from 0845-1600.
How to Phone Home For the UK dial 00 44 followed by the full STD number, but omitting the first zero.
Emergency Services Dial 113 for an ambulance, 112 for the police and 110 for the fire service.
Banks There are no banks in Flåm, but there is an ATM inside the Visitors' Centre.

Shore excursions you may be able to enjoy:

Travel by coach along the majestic Sognefjord to Aurland, a traditional fjordland village set around a 13th-century church, before proceeding to the amazing Stegastein viewpoint, where you have the opportunity to take photographs. The unique design of this lookout platform expresses the architects' desire to lift the visitors out into open space, and thereby enhance the experience of the panoramic view over the magnificent Aurlandsfjord. This project is part of a national programme to enhance tourist routes, commissioned by the Norwegian Highways Department and completed in 2006. The architects were Todd Saunders and Tommie Wilhelmsen. Continue to a local hotel for refreshments, consisting of coffee and waffles, before enjoying free time for exploration of the village on your own. You then return back along the fjord to Flåm and the ship.

Participants should expect to walk approximately 350 yards over flat ground, with five steps to negotiate, and some high thresholds. Any further walking during your free time is at your discretion. You should be prepared for changeable weather. This excursion is not recommended for anyone suffering from vertigo. Breathtaking Stegastein Viewpoint

This comprehensive full-day sightseeing tour begins with a short walk along the pier to the railway station platform to board the train for a memorable journey on the Flåm Railway, passing through a narrow valley hemmed in by towering, snow-capped mountains. As you ascend, the train pauses at Kjosfossen, where you can disembark to take photographs of the tumbling waterfall. Change trains at Myrdal and join the Oslo to Bergen main line to the village of Voss, which is pleasantly situated beside Lake Vangsvatnet. Although badly damaged during World War II, its old stone church dating from 1277 survives: it has some unusual features, including an octagonal steeple added during the 16th century. After a buffet lunch in the restaurant of a local hotel, continue by coach through Norway’s dramatic scenery, stopping at another beautiful waterfall, Tvindefossen, before heading down through Stalheim Canyon. After pausing in Stalheim, head off on the final part of your excursion, driving along a thrilling road that negotiates 13 hairpin bends in just one mile. Your return journey to Flåm passes through two long tunnels, which connect the village with Gudvangen.

There will be a few steps to board the train and there can be a wide gap between the train and the platform. Walking will amount to 200 yards in Flåm and 300 yards between Voss station and the restaurant. Any further walking is at your discretion. This tour may operate in reverse and the duration may vary by as much as an hour, depending on train timetables and routing. Views from the railway and roads will depend on the weather. This excursion must be booked in advance and cannot be booked on board ship. Dietary requests must be advised to the Shore Excursion Manager on board ship at least 72 hours prior to arrival. The mighty Kjossfossen waterfall

Savour one of Europe’s most impressive train rides on this interesting tour. The Flåm Railway is a remarkable piece of engineering and provides passengers with wonderful vistas of this beautiful part of Norway. In order to ensure the best possible views, the train will proceed slowly and even stop at the finest sections. You can alight at the stunning Kjosfossen Waterfall, where according to local legend, a ghostly female figure sometimes appears. After stepping off the train at the penultimate stop, walk to a nearby hotel for tea and coffee, served with home-made Norwegian waffles, jam and cream. There will be time to relax in the grounds of the hotel before re-joining the train for the scenic return journey.

This excursion requires walking approximately 200 yards from the pier to Flåm railway station, where there will also be a few steps to board the train. In places there can be a wide gap between the platform and the train. After alighting the train, there will be a further walk of around 200 yards up a fairly steep and uneven path to reach the hotel, where there are seven steps at the entrance. For customers with mobility issues we recommend the more leisurely-paced 'The Flåm Railway Made Easy' tour, which omits much of the more difficult walking. This excursion must be booked in advance and cannot be booked on board ship. Flåm Station is the starting point for one of Europe's most scenic rail journeys

Savour one of Europe’s most impressive train rides on this 'made easier' tour which we recommend for those passengers with mobility issues as much of the more difficult walking has been omitted. The Flåm Railway provides wonderful vistas of the mountains and waterfalls that characterise this beautiful part of Norway. In order to ensure the best possible views the train will proceed slowly and even stop at the finest sections so you have time to take in the dramatic scenery and take photographs. See the stunning Kjosfossen Waterfall where, according to local legend, a ghostly female figure has occasionally been seen. Your train ride takes you 2,850 feet up a mountain gorge and reaches its destination at Myrdal, where you can alight for a few minutes to take photos of the snow-capped mountains and explore the station, or remain seated before returning directly to Flåm.

This excursion involves up to 300 yards' walking and a few steep steps to board the train. In places there can also be a wide gap between the platform and the train. A ramp is available for wheelchair users, but due to the limited number that can be accommodated, it is essential that you notify the shore excursion staff on board ship in advance if you intend using a wheelchair on this excursion. Please also be aware that the toilets on the train are not wheelchair-accessible and that it is not possible for wheelchair users to alight at the waterfall stop. Views will depend on the weather. Most of the intermediate halts have short platforms: when the train stops at these, some of the rear carriages may be in a tunnel. Anyone wishing to take photos at these stops may need to get up and walk towards the front of the train. This excursion must be booked in advance and cannot be booked on board ship. Enjoy dramatic scenery from your train

Experience one of the most beautiful places in Norway, the Nærøyfjord. This spectacular narrow fjord, where cruise ships cannot go, is surrounded by steep mountains with snow-covered peaks that reach up to 5,000 feet above sea level. Waterfalls cascade down the mountains, and picturesque villages dot the landscape. Listed by UNESCO since 2005, this is considered one of the world's most beautiful fjord landscapes. Summer 2016 saw the launch of the 'Vision of the Fjords', a revolutionary new vessel that takes you for 20 miles along the fjord between Flåm and Gudvangen. Once it has arrived in the most scenic part of the fjord, it switches to battery power. It is then almost silent, allowing sightseers to enjoy Nature unspoilt by human activity. The vessel is about 109 feet long by 41 feet wide, and its distinctive outside walkways were inspired by a trail winding its way up a mountain. During the trip, you may walk all around the boat, and those wishing to sit inside will still enjoy panoramic views. The mini-cruise ends at Gudvangen, where a coach takes you from the pier through the narrow Naerøydalen Valley, pausing for photos at the Tvinde Waterfalls. You then continue down the Stalheimskleiva road past the Stalheimsfossen and Sivlefossen falls, and through the long tunnel under the mountain to Flåm.

Walking will not exceed 500 yards, but some of it will be over uneven ground, and there may be a few steps when embarking or disembarking the vessel. 'Vision of the Fjords' is not exclusive to Saga, and the operators reserve the right to substitute another vessel in the unlikely event of it being unavailable. The Stalheimskleiva road is steep and winding, with 13 sharp hairpin bends. Cruise on board 'Vision of the Fjords'

Saga Pearl II departs Flåm early this morning, for the final time in her farewell season, so that you can enjoy a daytime cruise across the dramatic Sognefjord giving you a chance to admire the scenery and capture some impressive holiday snaps.

Stavanger

Arrive 0800. Depart 1900.

Stavanger is a city of two halves, where white 18th-century wooden houses and cobblestone streets contrast vividly with the stylish shops and cafes of its cosmopolitan centre, which is compact and easily explored on foot. From here you may like to take a boat trip across the Lysefjord, past the spectacular 1,968 feet high cliffs of Pulpit Rock, you could hop on board a helicopter for a breathtaking ‘flightseeing’ tour, or you may like to join a sightseeing tour of Stavanger and see the monument commemorating the unification of Norway in 872AD, during the Viking Age. You can also learn more about the occupation of Stavanger during World War II with visits to Eiganes Cemetery, the Rogaland War Museum and the Fly Historisk Museum, which houses a number of vintage aircraft.

Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Stavanger flourished in the 19th century as a fishing port. While other towns in Norway have suffered with the decline of this industry, Stavanger has kept its economy booming by diversifying, first into shipbuilding and now into oil. These two contrasting industries have created a city of two halves – a modern area of high-rise buildings and a historic centre with cobbled streets and old wooden houses. The city centre was the birthplace of Alexander Kielland, one of the great 19th-century Norwegian novelists. Stavanger Cathedral, dating from 1125, is an impressive building and the only medieval cathedral in Norway that has not been substantially altered since it was first built. From Stavanger you can explore the attractive blue waters of Lysefjord, surrounded by cliffs and striking rock formations, and also visit Hafrsfjord where the Viking King Harald won an important battle that started the Unification of Norway. Those preferring to explore on their own may wish to visit the interesting Petroleum Museum.

FactFile

Population 130,000 (approximate)
Language Norwegian
Currency Norwegian Kroner
Time Difference UK+1
Climate Temperate with frequent rain
Ship berths at Strandkaien
Distance from Centre 300 yards
Distance from gangway to coach Less than 100 yards

Useful Information

Shopping Various shops and shopping malls can be found near the quayside.
Shopping Opening Hours Most are open Monday to Saturday from 1000-1700.
Post Office Located at 9 Haakon VII Gate. Opening hours are Monday to Friday from 0900-1800 and Saturdays from 1000-1500.
Tourist Office Located at Domskirkesplassen, and is open daily from 0900-1600.
How to Phone Home For the UK dial 00 44 followed by the full STD number, omitting the first zero.
Emergency Services Dial 113 for an ambulance, dial 112 for police and 110 for the fire service.
Banks Banks are located in the centre of Stavanger. Opening hours are Monday to Friday from 1000-1530. ATMs are available.

Shore excursions you may be able to enjoy:

Start with a city tour of Stavanger, and stop at the Swords in the Rock monument that commemorates the unification of Norway in 872AD, during the Viking Age. Then head out of the city and experience the Norwegian landscape of mountains, valleys and farmland. Drive south towards Sandnesand continue on smaller roads, passing lakes and farmland, until you reach a small settlement called Lauvik. Opposite the entrance to the magnificent Lysefjord, you stop at a delightful and idyllic little hideaway called 'Bakernes Paradis' - the Baker's Paradise. Originally a poor smallholding, settled around the year 1800, this farm was taken over by the Bakers' Union in the 1920s and became their holiday place - hence the name! The old houses have been carefully restored and this beautiful place now has a café and a small gift shop. You can even borrow a fishing rod and fish from the pier. Coffee and freshly-made waffles with sour cream and jam will be served. Fully refreshed, you head back to Stavanger. On your way to the port, you will pass the ruins of Sola Church, Sola beaches, Stavanger city centre and the Cathedral.

Very little walking is required on this excursion, but some of it may be over uneven ground. There are a few steps at the gift shop at Bakernes Paradis. Lauvik at the head of the Lysefjord

Located on the small fjord island of Sør Hidle, 'Flor and Fjære' is a unique botanical garden bursting with exotic flora, palm trees, lemon groves and a variety of plants that you would not expect to find in a garden so far north. This excursion begins with a scenic boat ride of around 20 minutes to reach the island, which you can then explore at your own pace. A member of the gardening staff will be on hand to answer any questions you might have about this unusual place. Tea and coffee will be served in a pavilion which provides stunning sea views. Flor and Fjære was established in 1965 by Åsmund Bryn who planted rows of pine trees and sika spruce to protect less hardy plants from the wind. He also built a small cottage on the island for his family to use as a holiday home. The gardens are now run by his son Olav and his wife Siri who decided to open the gardens to the public. One of the many visitors was Queen Sonja of Norway, who chose to celebrate her 70th birthday in the magical garden, adding to its popularity among tourists. After around one-and-a-half hours on the island, reboard the boat for the return sailing to Stavanger.

This excursion involves a walk of less than 200 yards between the pier and the boat. Once you arrive on the island, there are a couple of steps and a gangway to negotiate. However, to fully explore the garden you should expect to walk for up to half-a-mile over gravel paths and grass, some of which are on an incline. Good flat walking shoes and a rainproof jacket are recommended. On some departures, the boat may not be exclusive to Saga, and the overall duration of the tour may be up to 30 minutes longer. This tour operates subject to a strict minimum number of participants being reached. Flor and Fjaere Gardens

Pulpit Rock is one of southwest Norway’s most popular tourist attractions. Towering 1,982 feet above the Lysefjord, this flat mountain plateau was called Hyvlatanna or ‘planed tooth’ in ancient times. It is an amazing, much photographed landmark and its bare rock tabletop shape is in stark contrast to the green slopes and mountainsides that surround it. Having boarded the chartered boat you sail across to Lysefjord, a ribbon-like waterway that stretches 30 miles into the heart of the fjordlands, flanked on both sides by steep slopes, verdant mountainsides and the occasional small, picturesque farm. You pass directly below Pulpit Rock and pause for a while at the eerie Vagabond's Cave, before stepping ashore at Helleren Beach to enjoy coffee and waffles under the shelter of an overhanging cliff. You then sail back to the quayside in Stavanger.

The walk from the ship to the boat will amount to approximately 200 yards, and there is a further walk of 100 yards, over uneven ground, to the refreshment venue. There might be a number of steps to the upper deck of the boat. The boat may not have sufficient outside seating, and the views from some inside seats could be restricted. The boat is not always exclusive to Saga. Views of Pulpit Rock are dependent upon the weather conditions on the day. Owing to the boat times, you may need to take an packed lunch from the ship. Enjoy great views from your boat

Your tour starts with a drive out to a beautiful residential area located on a number of small islands, where nearly all the houses are built from wood and enjoy lovely views of the fjord and city. You next stop for photographs at Ledaal Manor, former home of writer Alexander Kielland and now the King's residence when he is in town. From here it is just a short stroll to Eiganes Cemetery, where the graves of 45 British war casualties of the Allied-Norwegian campaign in 1940 are located. Your drive then continues to Hafrsfjord and the 'Swords in Rock' Monument to hear how the Viking King Harald I defeated the last of the regional princes and started the unification of Norway. Returning to the city centre, stop at Stavanger Cathedral for photos. Built in the 12th and 13th centuries, the Cathedral is one of the few churches in Scandinavia that has kept its original design. Your tour ends with an optional walk through the cobbled streets of Old Stavanger. The small white-painted wooden houses were all built between the late 1700s and mid-1800s, and were the homes of the large families employed in the district's many canning factories. The area is now protected by a preservation order.

Walking at photo-stops is largely at your discretion, and should not exceed 200 yards. The ground at the 'Swords in Rock' monument is very uneven, and further walking with about 12 steps will be needed at the cathedral, which will only be viewed from the exterior. The guided walk through Old Stavanger amounts to just over one mile and involves cobblestones and uneven surfaces, but you may omit this part of the tour and return directly to the ship. There are limited restroom stops on this tour and the order in which sights are seen may vary. Stavanger's scenic waterfront

On this tour you can learn more about life in Stavanger during the Second World War, after it was occupied by German soldiers on April 9, 1940. Your first stop is at Eiganes Cemetery, home to the graves of 45 British war casualties of the Allied-Norwegian campaign in 1940. The proximity of Sola Airfield, now Stavanger Airport, to Great Britain, along with its good landing beaches and flat inland areas, made the area important in terms of strategic military planning for both German and Allied forces. Admission is included to the Fly Historisk Museum, located alongside the Hafrsfjord and housed in an authentic German aircraft hangar built in 1942. The exhibits include 32 vintage aircraft alongside a large assortment of engines and other aviation related artefacts. Of particular note are very rare Messerschmitt Bf 109 and Arado Ar 96 aircraft. Refreshments will be served in the museum. On your return journey to the ship, you drive past the Swords in the Rock Monument, which commemorates the Viking King Harald's defeat of the last of the regional princes and the start of the unification of Norway. You also see the ruins of Sola Church, an early 12th-century Romanesque stone church.

Walking at the Fly Historisk Museum amounts to between 200 and 300 yards, with a couple of steps to enter the museum building. Exhibits at the Fly Historisk Museum

From the the pier, take a short walk through the picturesque city of Stavanger to join a tour that will show you a typical Norwegian Home. Norwegian houses are distinguished by their wooden weather-boarding and slate roofs, and it is typical for them to be painted in bold colours such as red, blue, yellow or white. Traditionally, houses were built with small rooms that were easy to keep warm in the winter, and the steep roofs were designed to help the snow slide off. Windows are small, as glass lets out the heat, and there is always a fireplace or wood-burning stove in the centre of the house to keep it warm during the cold winters. You will be shown around by the owner, who will tell you all about what it is like to live in one of these beautiful old houses. Learn how they look after their gardens, how they furnish their homes, and about traditions that have been handed down through generations. You also have the opportunity to enjoy some typical Norwegian refreshments, including hot drinks and home-made waffles. After this fascinating look at local life, walk back to the pier with your guide.

This excursion involves walking a total distance of about 700 yards, mostly on the flat, with a few steps to be negotiated inside the house. Typical wooden houses in Stavanger

Spend the day at sea.

Dover

Arrive 0800.

Disembark Saga Pearl II after breakfast.

Known as the gateway of England, Dover welcomes millions of visitors from all over the globe each year in its role as the ferry capital of the world and the second busiest cruise port in the UK. The White Cliffs Country has a rich heritage. Within the walls of the town’s iconic castle, over 2,000 years of history waits to be explored, whilst the town’s museum is home to the Dover Bronze Age Boat, the world’s oldest known seagoing vessel. The town’s cliffs that are a welcome sight for today's cross-channel travellers also served as the control centre for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.

FactFile

Population 40,000
Language English
Currency British Pounds Sterling
Time Difference N/A
Climate Temperate with mild summers and cool winters, with a prevailing south-westerly wind throughout the year.
Ship berths at Dover Cruise Terminal.
Distance from Centre 1 mile
Distance from gangway to coach 400 yards, through the cruise terminal.

Useful Information

Shopping The main shops are found on Cannon Street and Biggin Street.
Shopping Opening Hours 0900 to 1730 Monday to Saturday. A few shops are open on Sundays.
Post Office The main Post Office is located inside the Costcutter store on Pencester Road.
Tourist Office The Tourist Office is located inside the Town Museum on Market Square.
How to Phone Home For the UK dial the full STD code followed by the subscriber's number.
Emergency Services Dial 999.
Banks Banks and ATMs are located on Cannon Street.

Please note

All excursions mentioned are optional, at an additional cost, and are subject to availability and change. Some of the highlights detailed may only be seen on optional excursions or by exploring independently.


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