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Beautiful blossoms, stunning Gothic architecture and captivating beaches make Majorca an island that you won’t want to leave

Majorca is the biggest and, some might say, the most beautiful of all the Balearic Islands. Sitting off the eastern coast of Spain, the island has long been a retreat of artists, composers and writers who come to Majorca to escape everyday life and return home feeling regenerated and full of fresh inspiration. Looking out over Majorca’s blossoming almond trees, peaceful harbours and crystal clear seas is enough to inspire anyone.

Holidays to Majorca offer you sophistication and pleasure, courtesy of towns like Manacor, where you can gain insight into the making of the famous Malorica® jewellery; ports like Pollensa that allow you to admire colourful boats and luxurious yachts; and towns like Palma Nova that place the soft sand of their beaches at your disposal. There’s the laidback Majorcan vibe, too, which makes the days and nights here so enjoyable, allowing you to just sit back with a glass of wine and embrace in the island’s charms.

 

Culture and history

Many Majorcans are Roman Catholics and religion is an important part of the island’s culture. When attending church, locals and visitors alike are expected to dress respectfully and refrain from wearing shorts, sleeveless tops or low cut tops.

A traditional part of the island’s gastronomic culture is the ensaïmada, a big, spiral-shaped pastry which is topped with powdered sugar. Some versions of this tasty snack include fruit or cream fillings, but the classic recipe goes without. Ensaïmadas are often eaten for breakfast on special occasions – so go ahead and treat yourself! Try a piece dipped in coffee and you’ll never want to leave the island.

Things to do

The beauty of travelling to Majorca is the variety of things to see and do while you’re there. You can get cultural in the capital, experience the sophistication of the towns on the island, get the lowdown on some of the trades that have made Majorca great and revel in the splendid scenery, all making for a thoroughly fantastic holiday. 

Palma

Half of the island’s population live in Palma, which is Majorca’s capital city and is just 20 minutes by car from popular resort towns like Palma Nova, enabling you to combine cultural days out on your holiday with lazy days of soaking up the sun on fabulous beaches. The capital is home to some of Majorca’s most impressive Gothic buildings and the premier attraction is, without doubt, Palma Cathedral, known locally as ‘La Seu’. Predominantly Gothic in style, this remarkable cathedral has a striking presence, appearing to almost be rising out of the sea from its position overlooking the harbour. Be sure to spend some time admiring the cathedral from outside before you head inside to see the architectural work of Antoni Gaudí. 

For a further exploration of Gothic architecture, you should visit Sa Llotja and Bellver Castle. Built in the 15th century, Sa Llojta was Palma’s merchant stock exchange and the building itself has a stone angel over the door which gives it the presence of a grand church. Bellver Castle has been standing for more than 700 years and the views over Palma bay from the top level are as magnificent as ever. 

Manacor

After a day of exploration in Palma, you might wish to retreat to the tranquil town of Manacor, where the widely renowned jewellery company Majorica® was founded in 1890. The formation of the company formation marked the start of the imitation pearl industry in Manacor and across the island. While you’re in Manacor, you can go on a guided tour of the Majorica® factory to learn about the intricate process of crafting elegant imitation pearls. Pop into the tax-free shop afterwards and you might find the perfect piece of jewellery for you or a loved one.

When you’ve had your fill of sparkles, take some time to look around the rest of this delightfully old-fashioned town. Enjoy a pleasant walk through the town centre and towards the pretty cathedral. Siesta is still observed here, so remember that most shops will be closed between two and five o clock in the afternoon.

Pollensa

Pollensa is a small town filled with old-time charms that will make you feel at home. Watch the locals go about their business in the old town’s main square, Plaça Major, and discovering new restaurants and cafes to relax in. Indulge in a glass of local wine and a selection of tapas to make the most of Mediterranean living.

At the town’s port, Puerto Pollensa, you’ll see the dazzling collection of brightly painted local fishing boats and expensive yachts that dock here. Stroll leisurely along the seafront and if you’re eager to do more, you can hop onto a boat for a trip around the gorgeous Pollensa Bay.

Flight time

Direct flights from London to Palma take less than two and a half hours. Why not use the time to brush up on your Spanish skills? Start studying our handy phrases to get a head start!

Currency

Euro - As a part of the European Union, Majorca’s currency is the euro, which is divided into 100 cents.

Passports and visas

The only documentation that British citizens need to travel to Majorca is a valid passport, saving you the inconvenience of applying for a visa.

Visit GOV.UK for more advice on passports and visas.

Phrases

¡Hola! – Hello

Buenos días – Good morning

¡Perdón! – Excuse me

Por favor – Please

Gracias – Thank you

¿Cuánto cuesta? – How much is this?

Me gustaría – I would like

¿Habla inglés? – Do you speak English?

¡Salud! – Cheers!

Timezone

Majorca is on Central European Time (CET), so the island is currently just one hour ahead of the UK at all times. In late March, the Majorcans put their clocks forward an hour and then, after summer, wind it back an hour.

Electricity

Write yourself a reminder to pack EU plug adapters for your holiday to Majorca. The island uses EU two-pin plugs as standard, which means you’ll need an adaptor to use any electronics you bring from home.

Language

Spanish; Castilian - A lot of Majorcan residents are bilingual and can speak both Spanish and Catalan fluently. The local dialect is called Mallorquí and you’ll find that place names are usually written in both languages. Learning a few Spanish phrases will help you to communicate with locals, and if you’re staying in popular holiday areas, you’ll find that many hospitality workers have a good understanding of English.

Tipping

When dining out, a 10% tip is considered reasonable as a recognition of good service. If you’ve received exceptional service or eaten with a large group, a 15% tip will show staff that you appreciate their work.

Tips aren’t usually expected in bars, cafes or taxis, but leaving small change or rounding up your bill to the next euro is always met with gratitude. Tipping in hotels is a personal choice. You can leave a few euros in an envelope for the cleaning staff or give a small gift to an attentive member of staff. You’ll be certain to make someone’s day.

Climate

Majorca has the same sunny disposition as the rest of Spain, with mild winters and hot summers that give you the best of the Mediterranean climate. Average temperatures range from 21-26°C from June to September and can hit highs of a whopping 30°C or more! July rewards locals and holidaymakers alike with an astounding 13 hours of sunshine a day, so whatever you do, don’t forget to pack your sun cream for your holiday.

May and October bring slightly cooler climes with average temperatures of around 18°C and highs of 24°C. Ultimately, Majorca is an island to savour at any time of the year. Whether you’re seeking scorching temperatures or something a little cooler, there’s a month that’s just right for your Majorca trip.

Health

Health information changes regularly, so we'd advise you to consult your GP at least 12 weeks before setting off on your holiday.

Country-specific information and advice on potential health risks is also published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre, and The British Foreign and Commonwealth Travel Advice Unit provides important health and safety information for British nationals travelling abroad.

Population and size

At 3,640 kilometres squared – roughly the size of Sussex – Majorca is the largest of Spain’s Balearic Islands and has a population of around 860,000 people. Nearly half of the population live in the island’s capital, Palma, and the sizeable tourism industry has helped the city to grow.

Smoking

Like most European countries, Majorca enforces a smoking ban, meaning you can’t smoke in enclosed areas such as bars, cafes or restaurants. Smoking in outside areas and terraces is permitted, so smokers can have a cigarette in the sun while non-smokers can eat their meal without worrying about second-hand smoke. However, you should always check before lighting up, especially around public buildings such as hospitals, where smoking is generally not permitted.



Climate