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    Sorrento Holidays

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    Sorrento Holidays
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    Sorrento Holidays
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    Sorrento Holidays

This pretty coastal town is a great base from which to explore this stunning region of Italy

Sorrento is a charming town on the western coast of southern Italy. Its bunched up houses and steep hugging of the gorge it’s situated on is typical of the Greco-Roman towns in the area. Perched on a picturesque stretch of coast, Sorrento is an ideal base from which to visit Naples, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Vesuvius, and Amalfi Coast – that is, amidst relaxing days spent on the beach, alongside its sapphire waters.

Southern Italy is all of the stereotypes of Italian life: warm, cobbled streets and markets bustling with life not too dissimilar to how it would have been lived two thousand years ago – but now with more iPhones and motorbikes! The southern Italians are easygoing and friendly, just remember to say "ciao" and "grazie"!

Culture and history

Sorrento’s culture and history dates back Roman times, where it was believed to be a colony of Lipara at the time. Many of the towns’ Roman influences can still be seen in the remnants of the many ruins still visible today, as well as in its many museums.

This history stretches into the town’s strong commitment to religion, with the dominant religion being that of Roman Catholic. The Rites of Holy Week is of particular importance, which involves several processions which take place on Good Friday.

Sorrento is split into two distinct areas - New Town and Old Town. The Old Town is home to plenty of winding streets full of colourful shops and stalls, while the New Town is home it’s many museums and restaurants. We recommended taking the chance to experience both to get a full flavour of what Sorrento has to offer!

Speaking of food and drink, Sorrento is well known for its production of oranges and lemons with it being a production hub for both fruits. The lemons in particular are used to make the popular limoncello, so be sure to try some if you get the chance! Seafood is also plenty thanks to being so close to the ocean, plus you won’t have to look far to taste some authentic Italian pizza either.

Sorrento has also been home to many celebrated individuals, such as the 16th century poet Torquato Tasso. The town is also popular with football fans, with it being home to Stadio Italia, the homeground of A.S.D Sorrento football club.

Things to do

Naples, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Vesuvius, and the Amalfi Coast are all within an hour and a half’s journey from Sorrento. So there’s plenty to explore in the region!

Naples

Naples was historically one of the Italian superpowers, and the birthplace of the Baroque style. It’s been inhabited since the Neolithic period, but began really growing when sailors from Rhodes formed an outpost there in the first millennium BC. It has since grown into the third largest city in Italy – after Rome and Milan.

The birthplace of Caravaggio, as well as numerous other artists, the city’s expansive history means it has a wealth of architectural examples to display – all beside a rich cultural tapestry.

Pompeii

The remains of Pompeii provide a striking glimpse into ancient Roman life – having come to a particularly gruesome end. Almost like an insect preserved in amber, the lives of Pompeii were captured at the moment of their end in the ash and lava that ended them.

Today, the remains remain beautiful views of a wealthy life – and the copious graffiti and messages found inside the houses offer a real insight into the everyday lives and language of the people who lived history, rather than what we’re used to from the people who wrote it.

Herculaneum

Herculaneum, like Pompeii, was preserved in the ash of Mount Vesuvius until it was discovered, quite by chance, while digging a well in 1709. It was smaller than Pompeii, but much wealthier – and this is evident in the wealth of beautiful mosaics and artwork uncovered from the ash.

Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius, as beautiful as it is, is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. It has erupted dozens of times since the eruption that destroyed Herculaneum and Pompeii and currently puts the 3 million inhabitants who live around it in danger. That said, its warm makes the area highly fertile – and there are numerous monitoring and emergency response programs in place to stop a tragedy in the event of another eruption.

As it stands today, it’s a particularly picturesque walk a mere stone’s throw away from the architecturally picturesque Naples.

Amalfi Coast

The Amalfi Coast makes up a stretch of exceptionally stunning beauty around the town of Amalfi. Its warm climate and verdant lands make it a wonderful place to relax in comfort.

Health

It’s important to ensure you are fit and healthy before departing for your holiday, so we recommend you consult your GP at least 12 weeks before departure.

As health information can change at any time, we’d advise you to consult your GP at least 12 weeks before departure.

Country-specific information and advice on possible health risks is also published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre and the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office provides important health and safety information for British nationals travelling abroad.

Culture and history

Sorrento’s culture and history dates back Roman times, where it was believed to be a colony of Lipara at the time. Many of the towns’ Roman influences can still be seen in the remnants of the many ruins still visible today, as well as in its many museums.

This history stretches into the town’s strong commitment to religion, with the dominant religion being that of Roman Catholic. The Rites of Holy Week is of particular importance, which involves several processions which take place on Good Friday.

Sorrento is split into two distinct areas - New Town and Old Town. The Old Town is home to plenty of winding streets full of colourful shops and stalls, while the New Town is home it’s many museums and restaurants. We recommended taking the chance to experience both to get a full flavour of what Sorrento has to offer!

Speaking of food and drink, Sorrento is well known for its production of oranges and lemons with it being a production hub for both fruits. The lemons in particular are used to make the popular limoncello, so be sure to try some if you get the chance! Seafood is also plenty thanks to being so close to the ocean, plus you won’t have to look far to taste some authentic Italian pizza either.

Sorrento has also been home to many celebrated individuals, such as the 16th century poet Torquato Tasso. The town is also popular with football fans, with it being home to Stadio Italia, the homeground of A.S.D Sorrento football club.

Things to do

Naples, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Vesuvius, and the Amalfi Coast are all within an hour and a half’s journey from Sorrento. So there’s plenty to explore in the region!

Naples

Naples was historically one of the Italian superpowers, and the birthplace of the Baroque style. It’s been inhabited since the Neolithic period, but began really growing when sailors from Rhodes formed an outpost there in the first millennium BC. It has since grown into the third largest city in Italy – after Rome and Milan.

The birthplace of Caravaggio, as well as numerous other artists, the city’s expansive history means it has a wealth of architectural examples to display – all beside a rich cultural tapestry.

Pompeii

The remains of Pompeii provide a striking glimpse into ancient Roman life – having come to a particularly gruesome end. Almost like an insect preserved in amber, the lives of Pompeii were captured at the moment of their end in the ash and lava that ended them.

Today, the remains remain beautiful views of a wealthy life – and the copious graffiti and messages found inside the houses offer a real insight into the everyday lives and language of the people who lived history, rather than what we’re used to from the people who wrote it.

Herculaneum

Herculaneum, like Pompeii, was preserved in the ash of Mount Vesuvius until it was discovered, quite by chance, while digging a well in 1709. It was smaller than Pompeii, but much wealthier – and this is evident in the wealth of beautiful mosaics and artwork uncovered from the ash.

Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius, as beautiful as it is, is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. It has erupted dozens of times since the eruption that destroyed Herculaneum and Pompeii and currently puts the 3 million inhabitants who live around it in danger. That said, its warm makes the area highly fertile – and there are numerous monitoring and emergency response programs in place to stop a tragedy in the event of another eruption.

As it stands today, it’s a particularly picturesque walk a mere stone’s throw away from the architecturally picturesque Naples.

Amalfi Coast

The Amalfi Coast makes up a stretch of exceptionally stunning beauty around the town of Amalfi. Its warm climate and verdant lands make it a wonderful place to relax in comfort.

Health

It’s important to ensure you are fit and healthy before departing for your holiday, so we recommend you consult your GP at least 12 weeks before departure.

As health information can change at any time, we’d advise you to consult your GP at least 12 weeks before departure.

Country-specific information and advice on possible health risks is also published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre and the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office provides important health and safety information for British nationals travelling abroad.



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