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Tenerife

Saga Pearl II blog - Captains' blogs

20th February, 2019

A short hop south to the Canary Island group saw our little ship approaching the northern end of Tenerife and its main City, Santa Cruz, in the early morning sunshine.

On our way into the harbour we passed one of those enormous cruise ships on which looked like it housed about 17,000 people, blocking out our sun for about 5 minutes as we ghosted past, hundreds of curious German passengers standing in dressing gowns on their balconies staring down at our little vessel. A few of them managed a slightly confused looking wave in our direction. I felt tempted to play the National Anthem over the PA but on second thought, 07:30 is a tad early for that sort of fun, isn’t it?!

Once we had berthed and I had given the day’s positive weather predictions over the PA, passengers started filtering down through the ship to the gangway where many would be enjoying a good selection of organised excursions ashore today. The largest of the Canary Islands, volcanic Tenerife sports plenty for all. From the dizzy heights of Mount Teide (12,000ft high) to white sandy beaches, vineyards and UNESCO World Heritage sites such as La Laguna (Tenerife’s previous capital city), nobody would be getting bored today.

That was, except for the Captain, who had to endure a morning of meetings. Luckily though being the Captain, I had the freedom to postpone some of them – which is exactly what I did – and instead headed ashore for some well-deserved tapas and a nice cold glass of Shandy. A pleasant walk through Santa Cruz posed an unusual conundrum of where to eat, for as is so often in Spain, there were so many attractive looking restaurants to choose from. My choice seemed a good one, and I left feeling very satisfied to wander back through the narrow back streets towards the ship where Saga Pearl’s senior officers eagerly awaited to pick up the meetings where we left off. With a full belly I wasn’t in the mood, though, and so cancelled them.

Just before sunset, we were all ready to sail, except for the fact that we were missing 2 passengers. A frantic phone call to the ship confirmed that they were stuck in traffic 10 minutes outside the port, so being the sort of chap I am, I thought we’d wait for them on this occasion. Especially considering the inevitable difficulty it would be to fly from the Canary Islands down to Cape Verde!

Once our final couple were ushered on board, we set sail south and into the Tropics. Two relaxing days at sea in the sunshine would have us in very pleasant climes indeed, ending up at 17 degrees north of the equator. I shall speak to you from there!

Captain Kim Tanner

The opinions expressed are those of the author and are not held by Saga unless specifically stated.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal, medical or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Always obtain independent, professional advice for your own particular situation.

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